The Absolute Latest News on the OWE/AEW Partnership: CIMA’s status confirmed, SCU in Shanghai!

Oriental Wrestling Entertainment

– OWE’s Wulijimuren, also known as the “Mongolian Warrior,” injured his knee while wrestling in Osaka during OWE’s debut tour of Japan. Unfortunately, from what I have heard, it is an issue with his meniscus. OWE’s COO has advised me that the projected timeline for recovery is approximately six months, but may be less. Regrettably this means he will not be able to work the tournament he was scheduled to participate in to determine which OWE roster members would work at Double or Nothing.

– On May 1st, five people representing AEW will visit Shanghai to meet with OWE: Chris Harrington, Christopher Daniels, Frankie Kazarian, Scorpio Sky, and Jeff Jones. It was mentioned to me that SCU might work one of OWE’s Shanghai Great World shows during their visit.

– OWE’s shows in Japan were viewed as successful by management, with particular emphasis put on how happy they were with how well received their shows were. They were very low on stock immediately after their Korakuen Hall show with their merchandise mostly selling out, if not completely sold out, by the end of the three shows.

– After CIMA’s signing by AEW was announced, rumours about what this means for his status with OWE, and OWE’s status with its investors, began to circulate on Twitter. OWE’s COO Michael Nee has advised me that CIMA’s deal with AEW “Has nothing to do with what he is doing in Japan and China,” and that when he isn’t working for AEW he will always be doing things for OWE in China. Or, to put it succinctly, “Nothing changed.” I also learned that CIMA is really mad at the twitter user spreading these rumours about OWE.

– During my conversation with Michael about CIMA’s status re: AEW he advised me that many other Japanese wrestlers have signed with AEW as well, and that he saw some of them in Japan on his trip. We already know that AEW has signed a number of Japanese talent to their brand, including Michael Nakazawa who worked OWE’s Japanese shows. This may indicate that more Japanese talent announcements’ are in our future, or may simply be who we already know about.

– OWE had a successful performance on a Chinese satellite TV variety show. You can view the footage I’ve seen here.

 

King of Pro Wrestling

– After a decent stretch of silence, news recently came out from both Shuaijiao, China’s biggest pro wrestling news site, and KOPW themselves, that KOPW have partnered with DGFBA (Dongguan City Fighting Boxing Association,) a boxing promotion  in Dongguan, China. This partnership will see a strategic partnership formed between the two promotions to co-promote events under a specific branding called, as best as I can deduce, Baowu Wolf Extreme Boxing Championship, which blends together both styles and has involvement from even the Dongguan Wushu Association in some capacity. Trials for this idea will be held on April 27th  and 28th. From this article it appears to be an opening bout of pro wrestling before a night of boxing. If Chinese MMA organization MMC’s experimentation with and support for pro wrestling in China has any bearing on this, there is a strong chance to convert fans off of this course of action.

 

Middle Kingdom Wrestling

– MKW have announced their next show, Dragon Roar, in Harbin, China and will take place on June 16th. This event will bring Joshi back to China, further cementing the strong presence of Joshi on Chinese pro Wrestling undercards as a fundamental element of the scene, and will expand on their partnership with Japanese indie Pro Wrestling Alive.

 

World Wrestling Entertainment

– I’ve heard rumours from reliable, credible sources that the WWE will be holding another tryout in Shanghai within the coming months.

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OWE in Japan: Sellouts and New Dates! (plus more!)

– Both of OWE’s Japan dates have officially sold out. Contrary to what the OWE Twitter account said,  ” Sorry , friends in Japan , will announce next OWE shows in Japan soon!,” the OWE Facebook page and Michael Nee have both indicated the next date is June 24th 2019. No venue has been announced yet.

 

– A recently published article on OWE’s official WeChat account indicated that the round-robin tournament to decide who will go to AEW’s Double or Nothing event will be starting back up again. The fan vote has concluded to determine that Xuan Xuan, who beat his nearest competition by over 300 support ticket votes, is back in the tournament.

As the eliminated competitor to get a second chance in the tournament, he was originally supposed to team with Hyperstreak, but the article also announced that Hyperstreak had to pull out due to an injury. He will be replaced by Fan Qiuyang, guaranteeing that any team who wins will feature Chinese talent at Double or Nothing, .

The initial article has since been deleted by the user who uploaded it to OWE’s WeChat platform, and has been replaced with an almost identical article which shuffled the formatting and media placement a bit. The key differentiator between the two is that only the first article published specifically mentioned Fan Qiuyang as Xuan Xuan’s new partner, while the second article skips over that detail.

There has been, unfortunately, no confirmation on whether or not any of OWE’s roster have had their visas approved as of yet.

 

– Based on a poll on OWE’s facebook page, it is likely that NEO-TV will be prioritizing the “Who Will In” tournament over older, unreleased content from the tournament to crown OWE’s first champion.

 

– From looking at the announced line-ups for the Japanese dates, these shows will not see any of the tournament action. That being said, the AEW/OWE connection seems to be strengthened by Michael Nakazawa working the cards.

 

– in the latest episode of Being The Elite, Matt and Nick Jackson announced that AEW has signed CIMA to a full time contract. What this means for his position as president of Dragon Gate International and as VP and head trainer of OWE is, as of yet, unknown.

MKW vs. OWE? MKW Belt and Road show in Nepal, OWE’s “Journey to the West” and more!

Middle Kingdom Wrestling

Post match comments from MKW’s rising rookie star Micahel Su after his match with Hyperstreak point towards a future MKW vs. OWE storyline, with Hyperstreak being billed as a representative of the Shanghai based Oriental Wrestling Entertainment who first brought him into the country. His match with “Masterclass” Michael Su was not planned more than a few days in advance of the event on March 10th, but came together in the light of MKW champ Big Sam’s emergency appendectomy.

With the unanticipated nature of this match and how it came together, it’s hard to say that there are any concrete plans in the works already. This very well may be simply clever capitalization to lay the foundation for something that may never materialize.  That being said, there are some interesting facts to consider that lead to this being something I can certainly see come together off of the heels of this opportunity.

First and foremost, it is no secret that OWE have been in contact with NKW owner Adrian Gomez, even before this recent talent sharing venture, including possibly some consulting done by Gomez for the newer promotion. With this connection already in place, and Gomez himself saying that he’s looking to have his talent work more dates and more promotions in 2019, it’s not hard to see this as a path he would wish to develop further upon. Particularly with the ROH vs. CZW storyline being one of his favourites in pro wrestling history.

Both companies would likely benefit far more from this collaboration, with the particular circumstances of the burgeoning Chinese pro wrestling scene being what they are, than the US analogues from that famous indie blockbuster feud did. Indeed, with OWE having essentially brought NTW under its wing, and having Gao Yuan on its roster, the owner of WLW, the scope of an inter-promotional rivalry/invasion angle could be massive in scale for the tightly knit, nascent Chinese pro wrestling scene.

 

– MKW’s first “Belt and Road” tournament was their biggest, riskiest venture to date, bringing together talent from numerous countries to compete in a two day tournament to crown their first ever Belt and Road champion. Now the date for their second Belt and Road tournament has been set. Happening on May 11th, this show will be held in Kathmandu, Nepal.

This is significant for several reasons. If this shows goes off as advertised it will be the first international outing for MKW since their shows in Thailand, which drew poorly due to unfortunate circumstances surrounding the event (including the death of a Thai royal). Furthermore, it looks to have more legs under it than their attempt to run a show in South Korea in conjunction with Professional Live Action (PLA.)

 

Ultimate Wrestling Asia

On March 20th this HKWF Twitter account broadcast thr message that a company featuring talent from promotions across mainland China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan, Singapore, and The Philippines would be “coming soon” in this tweet. They even named it “Ultimate Wrestling Asia” in the hashtags. Within a matter of days, an official twitter account for this potential brand sprung up. My correspondence with the account has indicated that they are in the early planning stages of something they hope to grow into a big super show regional promotion, with desires to film episodes for weekly broadcast at some point.

While a tweet like this, announcing the formation of a brand new wrestling promotion, may seem a bit suspect at first, particularly with how barebones and vague it has been, this does feel like a natural extension of Ho Ho Lun’s “Asian Wrestling Revolution” ideology.  This  is coming from an account associated with the HKWF, who are the first promotion founded by this patriarch of Asian pro wrestling.

At the very least, it is already generating buzz and discussion about the non-Japanese East Asian, Southeast Asian, and South Asian scene, as indicated by articles like this springing up. While they have no dates or roster set in stone yet, I can assure you that any developments that happen I will keep you abreast of.

 

Oriental Wrestling Entertainment

March 9th saw the first of the round robin tournament matches to determine which pair of talent will head to AEW’s Double or Nothing event take place at the Great World venue in Shanghai. The match between the teams of “The Captain” A-Ben/”Commando” Duan Yingnan and Rekka/”Scorpio XX” Liu Xinxi ended in a 15-minute time limit draw. Both teams presently have one point apiece. No tournament matches were held on March 16th, and the event on the 23rd had to be canceled due to other obligations. So far, this remains the sole “Who Will In” tournament match to have taken place.

 

– Starting with OWE’s March 16th show at the Great World venue the company is trying something fresh. The venue is located inside an area that functions as a hub for Chinese tourists from other parts of the country to come through and look upon the old fashioned architecture and shop for trinkets and the like. Visitors are paying to gain admission to the Shanghai Great World itself, and are not necessarily there for the pro wrestling. This may sound familiar to those who know of Impact Wrestling’s history with the theme park based Impact Zone venue.

However, unlike that western comparison, the average visitor to Great World really has no clue what pro wrestling even is, so selling them on attending the matches is even harder. To try and create an environment which is conducive to attracting an audience out of these wrestling-uninitiated tourists, OWE are couching some of these performances in recreating a cultural touchstone for all of China, the famous story “Journey to the West.”

They’ve cast their talent in different roles from the famous novel and have them compete in bouts whose storylines are easy to follow, as the average Chinese citizen will most assuredly be familiar with the material being drawn upon. While Gao Yuan has indicated to me that there were some problems in blending this classic story with wrestling on their first time out, one can always expect hiccups in a first attempt at something new. If successful with the shows at the Shanghai Great World venue, Michael Nee has indicated to be that this idea of combining historical or classic fictional stories with OWE’s wrestling may become a part of their touring shows, adapting regional narratives as they visit different parts of China, to help engage and educate the population  on the art if pro wrestling. I’ve explained before why I see OWE as “Truly Chinese Pro Wrestling” and this venture shows just how far outside the conventional western wrestling box they’re willing to go.

 

– On top of announcing Buffa has joined OWE, the company has also confirmed in their official communications that which has already been made clear on social media: Sky and Gaia Hox from Taiwan, and Gao Yuan from Mainland China, have joined the company in an official capacity.

 

– NTW’s relationship with OWE is growing stronger, with it becoming common knowledge in wrestling circles in China and Taiwan that the current owner of NTW has taken a position with OWE. Some fears have been expressed by those I have spoken to that this will lead to the eventual demise of NTW as a Taiwanese brand, as there are a lot of tensions between the governments of China and Taiwan.

 

– Unfortunately three of OWE’s advertised roster members for the upcoming NTW vs. OWE show on March 31st have fallen victim to what seems to be the number one problem in every international outing for this young crop of stars: visa issues.  As such, Zhao Yilong, Zhao Junjie, and Wang Jin will not be able to appear in Taiwan. This mark’s the 2nd time that Zhao Yilong and Wang Jin have been prevented from working in NTW due to visa issues. Nevertheless, the reworked card still looks quite exciting, with Gao Jingjia filling one of their spots.

 

– UK and other European talent will be showing up in OWE soon via the connections OWE have made through the UK-based NEO-TV. This is something they are clearly proud of, because they have made efforts to spread this news on both their Chinese and English-language social media pages.

 

– OWE’s two Japanese dates have officially sold out! Congratulations!

Exciting OWE News: AEW Collaboration, International Dates

This past Friday night I had the chance to chat with OWE COO Michael Nee for the first time since the thunderous announcement from AEW’s press rally in Jacksonville, Fl. rocked the Chinese Pro Wrestling scene by announcing that the two fledgling brands would be working together. I connected with him early in his day in China briefly before he headed off to the HenDian venue for rehearsals. He told me about the venue being a film set city, and compared it to Universal Studios. He elaborated upon how much of the buildings there reproduced various classical eras of Chinese architecture. One of the great things about Michael Nee is that he’s always excited about OWE and what they are doing.

When I asked him about AEW he explained to me that they’re still working on the details of the working agreement and have yet to settle on exact terms for the deal between their two companies. This being said they are really pleased to be working with AEW and will be aggressive in working with All Elite. OWE are willing to help AEW in any way they can. He explained that they are willing to “transfer their kids” to AEW and hold joint matches anywhere. Any kind of working relationship status will be open to discussion. While details are yet to be set in stone he did advise me that he, along with OWE’s owner Huayang Fu and VP CIMA, will be joining  a press conference and attending meetings in Las Vegas February 8th and 9th. We can expect more details then on the exact nature of how these brands will work together.

It is unquestionable that OWE’s roster have been developing quickly and the brand isn’t afraid to make changes to gimmicks on the fly, as numerous performers have metamorphosed heavily over the summer. However, the key to excelling as a roster will lie in their kids gaining experience working with more skilled performers. Traditionally the best way to do this has been by working abroad, when the talent pool in your region is either underdeveloped or doesn’t offer you what you seek. Over the course of 2018 OWE attempted to have many of its outstanding young roster get some international experience under their belts but struggled in many cases to obtain the appropriate visas.

With the relationship with AEW looking to bring OWE’s homegrown talent stateside yet again, these concerns about visas came to my mind again and I asked him about the subject. He explained to me that the biggest challenges the faced in getting their Chinese roster the appropriate visas in the past was centered on them not having all their proper documentation and requirements met. For many they didn’t have proper residential documents, or bank accounts with the required minimum balance present, to be able to get the visas approved. Over the year OWE has been working on ensuring all of their students have these issues sorted out to ensure that visas are no longer denied. It also certainly will not hurt that their partner stateside is now backed by a billionaire and will be viewed by visa offices as a more financially stable entity than other partner promotions before them. He says that their travel agent is confident they will be able to travel.

Partnering with AEW and its prestige Billionaire-backer is likely to greatly facilitate international travel for these lads to North America. But, OWE are not hedging all of their international performance bets on AEW. In fact, Mr. Nee revealed to me that at the end of March they will be visiting Taipei for a show, and will be in Osaka and Tokyo for shows between April 18th and the 20th. Furthermore, while no time has been set, he communicated that they are interested in running in Thailand as well.

This falls well in line with the ethos of OWE he expressed throughout our chat. They seek to increase the global connectivity of cultural arts through the best platform possible: pro wrestling. He spoke of how they’ve barely scratched the surface of the numerous styles of Chinese Kung-Fu and historical figures and subjects to draw upon for material and how the martial arts and cultures of other places, such as Thailand’s Muay Thai, are things they would also like to bring into the fold with OWE. I would not be surprised to see them try and bring in recruits from Thailand and India in the long run, to help expand this vision and provide more variety to their roster.

Between these subjects he explained to me that OWE has to pay for to broadcast their show on Chinese TV, which they recently started doing, and wondered if a platform like Twitch would be beneficial for his brand to get directly into. Our conversation turned, inevitably, towards the eventual expectations of having English video content as the company increases its English language social media presence. He said that, while he was very busy, it shouldn’t be too hard for him to put together English subtitles and he might see if some of the English speaking wrestling talent could do commentary. No promises or ETA on this subject, but a recognition that it shouldn’t be too challenging for them to put something together when the time comes.

 

#DiscoveringWrestling #024 – Powerbomb.TV are breaking down barriers for Indie Wrestling

On June 11th 2017 the independent Pro-Wrestling world will once again be breaking the barrier between content and audience, as Powerbomb.TV will be hosting a veritable who’s-who of indie stars in Old Forge, Pennsylvania to promote their streaming service, and help spread awareness of the many brands and star talents available on it.

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Look at how crisp that design is!

In 1999 the founders of scoopswrestling.com arranged the original Break the Barrier, an indie wrestling super-card featuring the likes of Mike Quackenbush, Headbanger Mosh, and Stevie Richards. The card featured participants from thirteen indie promotions and had many different titles on the line. This event from a bygone era completely flew under my radar until Powerbomb.TV announced that they were holding their own event, referencing this past crowning achievement in cross-promotion indie super-card booking. In referencing this event they draw stark comparisons to their own, highlighting that they are bringing together a startling number of promotions under their banner, and also forcing people to become aware of this long dead event. This confrontation seems to be to highlight the fact that had an infrastructure, like their own, been in place back in 1999 to distribute this event it may be more talked about and remembered today.

The card for Break the Barrier is stacked. Seriously, click on that link. Maybe you’re familiar with these guys, maybe this is the first time you’ve ever seen these names. Nevertheless, trust me, this card is great. How great? Let me tell you just about few of the reasons I’m excited for this show:

1: The Olde Wrestling showcase match featuring Dasher Hatfield vs. Jeff King. This promotion puts on a time-travel period piece spin on Pro-Wrestling. They turn back the clock, wear simpler, period appropriate attire, pare down the move sets, pick-up the dialects of, and transports the audience to the roaring 20s. They lean heavily on novelty and comedy, with fanciful storytelling and endearing costuming and characterization. Dasher Hatfield is already an old-fashioned baseball playing hero, so he’ll fit right in, but more importantly he is a storied, exciting veteran over in Chikara Pro. This match promises to show you something you, most likely, have never seen before… and if you like what they’re doing, Powerbomb.TV has two whole events for you to dig your teeth into.

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Old-Timey wrestling for modern eyes!

2: Desean Pratt vs. Ophidian is going to be phenomenal. These two former tag-team partners have battled before, back in Chikara Pro, and each man has gotten more experienced, and better, over the last several years. They know each other intimately, and can tell a phenomenal story with each other in the ring. This will be a solid match, even if they each worked at 50% capability… but I have never seen them put on a match that wasn’t 100%. I’ve been a fan of these guys for near a decade, and distinctly one shirt size ago. If you’ve agreed with my opinions before, or like what I have professed to liking, give this show a chance for this match alone (and stick around for the other exciting matches as well!)

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The men who could travel through time…

3: C*4 bring to the event a match featuring Buxx Belmar, one of the weirdest, most exciting performers to come out of Montreal. Called Dirty and Filthy, Buxx Belmar moves around the ring in a way literally unique to him, that is discomforting and forces you to pay attention to him, and performs bizarre hardcore stunts and gross-out spectacles. That videos pretty gnarly, maybe you don’t wanna click on that link. Now, he’s not always that disgusting, and his weirdness is usually more entrancing. He is unlike anything you have seen before, and is constantly amazing me in how he puts new spins on Pro-Wrestling.

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The weird just oozes out of him!

That’s three great reasons to watch any show and I haven’t even mentioned the insane fact that a legend like Skayde is in a huge lucha libre match or that the main event is jam packed with talent. If you sign up for Powerbomb.TV’s free trial today you will get to see this indie super-card entirely for free, and once you’re pumped up by that free spectacular you’ll want to stick around and dig deep into what the service has to offer.

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Skayde was integral in training many of the men on this card via his association with Chikara pro.

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It’s almost a shame that this isn’t a full time promotion with a main event this exciting and international!

 Service Overview:

Their streaming service itself has a fair number of “pros” to list here. My favourite part of the service is that it has a striking number of companies signed up under its banner. At the time I was crunching my numbers it came to a total of thirty-three promotions with a combined total of One-Hundred-and-Seventy-Three shows spread across them. Each company’s landing page provides the subscriber with links to the various social media, video, and web platforms that company has. This provides people like me with a desire to discover wrestling (see what I did there?) something to really sink their teeth into. Powerbomb.TV, therefore, make themselves an indispensible asset to someone who is looking to scout new talent from around the world, or someone who simply wants to find something completely fresh to engage with. One moment I am watching Italian wrestling, the next hardcore Lucha Libre, the next a bizarre glimpse into history with the retro-chic Olde Wrestling. All for $10.00 a month. Your mileage may vary.

Sign-Up for the service is stupid easy, requiring only an e-mail address, and their billing options are diverse. Having PayPal as an option to counter-balance accruing needless credit card debt is absolutely phenomenal. It puts them on the level of big name players in the streaming service market. Once you have signed up and logged in the landing pages are well designed and easy to navigate, and video playback is generally a simple and clean experience.

Before I start listing the “Cons” of the service, I’ll admit that many of them seem nitpicky. I bring them up herein to point out things that, if improved, would likely guarantee people stay signed up to the service for longer periods of time.

While, strictly mathematically, the average number of shows per promotion is 5.25, it doesn’t really play out in such a balanced way. The vast bulk of these shows, 93 to be specific, can be attributed to just four of the promotions signed up to the service, while eleven of the promotions on the service have a paltry one show a piece. This uneven spread is problematic if what excites you on the service is on the scantier side of content volume, well, then you might not stick around for too long. Furthermore, only seven out of the thirty-three promotions available on the service have content from 2017 actively available. This means that a scant 21% of promotions have content that can be considered moderately current, and the numbers grow more stark when you look at how many videos out of the total are from this calendar year: 6.35%, or 11 videos out of 173. While this scarcity of up-to-date content has no impact on one’s ability to enjoy exploring new promotions and good wrestling, it does, however, mean that Powerbomb.TV is not going to be the place for those who have a need to keep absolutely up to date with the promotions they enjoy.

While I have praised above the ease of use of the service, and the quality of their landing pages, Powerbomb.TV does lack a feature that would greatly improve my enjoyment, and the general ease, of using the service: a search function. So, let’s say that you watched some videos and you really liked one specific guy, and let’s also say that it was one of the few promotions that has double digits worth of shows. In the current set up you have to go through every video the company has one-by-one to tray and find more content featuring that exciting individual. Certainly, some of the videos are one-off matches that list their participants in the titles, but others are full events and a basic set of built-in search functions would greatly improve the experience. A search feature would also allow you to find work that the performers have done in other brands that may be on the service as well. It seems almost too simple a concept to be lacking, and yet it does lack this feature.

Interview:

To get a better feeling for what Powerbomb.TV is, and aims to be, I reached out to Gerard Durling, co-founder of the service for a short interview.

NC: For those unaware, who are you and what is your background?

GD: My name is Gerard Durling and I’m the founder of Coal Creative internet marketing, co-founder of Powerbomb.tv independent wrestling video on demand service. I guess you can say that, in a previous life, I was an independent wrestler by the name of “Vin Gerard” and “Equinox” in CHIKARA.

NC: What made you transition from being an in-ring performer to a partner in a streaming service?

GD: Well, the in-ring performer stuff has been behind me now for about 5-years. Personally, I didn’t feel like I was advancing myself enough to continue performing the amount I was. In my last year of wrestling, I was also creating my first start-up business that was gaining some attention from investors. I ended up taking a deal and it required me to be available a lot on weekend evenings. That is of course, when most independent wrestling shows were. It felt like a natural progression and break to see what else I could do outside of it.

In the last year or two, my company Coal Creative, has really expanded ourselves into video marketing. That’s how this all started with Powerbomb.TV – I was approached by Adam Lash to see if I’d be interested in getting involved in the project with him.

NC: With all the recent waves being made in the streaming service market concerning Pro-Wrestling (WWE Network, NJPW World, Lucha Underground on Netflix, multitudinous indie promotions having their own dedicated streaming options etc.) what is your vision to make Powerbomb.tv stand out from the crowd?

GD: Adam and I both share a passion for wanting to help independent wrestling be more successful and to help however we can. We’re not millionaires, that’s for sure. We can’t compete with some of these services in dollars. We thought that by creating this service, we could reinvest into the companies that work with us. We’re not in this to make money from the subscription service. We want to help make a difference on the independent level and to expose fans to new talent and promotions.

NC: What do you offer to Promoters and Fans that sets you apart as a business partner and as a service to invest in?

GD: I think we offer promoters a lot of opportunity. If someone asks us for help with anything, we’re always open to trying to figure out a way to make it work. As for fans, we have a very diverse catalog of content already, over 30 promotions, and a lot are from partners in Mexico. We want to try to involve the promotions we work with as much as we can in creating out of the box ideas that will garner more attention for everyone.

NC: Who on Powerbomb.tv are you most excited to watch? Who should people be keeping their eyes on?

GD: A lot of the independent lucha libre has me excited. We have some opportunities there to create some interesting content that could help educate American wrestling fans to some of the new faces of Lucha Libre. We’re looking into providing alternate commentary for some of those promotions. C*4 in Ottawa Canada deserves a lot more attention for some of the shows they’ve put together over the last few years.

In Conclusion:

Powerbomb.TV is positioning itself in the independent pro-wrestling scene as an exciting alternative to the standard distribution models of DVD and VOD sales, whose scope offers people like me, and hopefully people like you, something fresh and exciting. While there are some concerns I have raised about the content and the platform’s functionality, this is a living service that is routinely being updated. Since I crunched my numbers at least six new videos across a minimum of three different promotions have been added. I think that they have all the potential in the world to become an exciting, vibrant hub for fans of independent and international pro-wrestling to find what they are craving. I look forward to seeing their offerings expand, and to seeing them take more interesting marketing initiatives like Break the Barrier 2017. Don’t forget to sign up for your free trial today and watch Break the Barrier on June 11th, then dig into the offerings the participating promotions have on the service!

Do you have any feedback or questions? Please leave a comment here.

Don’t forget to Like my FaceBook page and Follow me on Twitter!

 

 

#DiscoveringWrestling #019 – #TorontoWrestling reviews Ring of Honor at the Ted Reeve Arena

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The official event logo. Property of Ring of Honor.

May 7th 2017 I attended my fourth annual ROH/NJPW cross-promoted tour stop in Toronto. Each and every one held at the Ted Reeve Community Arena. Before we get to the actual review of the show, I wanted to take a brief moment to talk about the venue. I have, over the years, developed a love/hate relationship with the hockey arena. It holds a good amount of people, and the sight lines from pretty much anywhere in the venue are great, perfectly fine to enjoy the matches. But it’s also prone to traffic jams, immense lines that criss-cross and get confused amongst each other when trying to deal with the meet and greet and merch tables. But worst of all is the huge bottleneck created by the venue using the hockey arena’s penalty boxes to move people from the entrance and GA seating to the floor. It makes no sense and has created giant swirling pools of confused people all mobbing for one way out. Somehow, surprisingly, this year I didn’t encounter any of that, but it was a first specific hell. It was a first.

I had to watch the first few matches while standing in line to see Kenny Omega, because they had seriously oversold the photo op tickets for the ever increasing in popularity killer talent. They at least owned up to it and made certain that everyone who had spent hard earned Canadian dollars got their autographs. I kinda felt sorry for the amazing Japanese talent. My friend and I both got through the line for one of my favourite stars, Hirooki Goto, in literally 0 seconds. No one was lined up for him. Naito had a good long line, but other than him only Kenny had a line. And his dwarfed everyone else put together.

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Here’s that picture I had to wait in the longest line for. Totally worth it!

I was lucky enough, while waiting in line with my friend who wanted a group shot with Los Ingobernables de Japon, to have a nice little moment with KUSHIDA. Naito’s line extended to a point where I was standing in front of KUSHIDA. I was rearranging my stuff, I was getting my camera ready and placed my Wrestle Kingdom 11 programme down in such a way that it caught his eye. KUSHIDA looked at me and asked, simply, “Internet?” while pointing at my programme. I smiled, laughed a bit and said “No. Tokyo.” His face lit up and he started asking me about which hotel I stayed at, like he was half-excited to hear about a Canadian travelling to Wrestle Kingdom, and half like he wanted to make certain i really stayed in Tokyo. I stumbled through mispronouncing the name of the Shiodome hotel where I stayed and eventually he smiled, pronounced it properly and I thanked him for the correction. It was a little throwaway moment, but it was me connecting with him on a very human, equal level. I loved it.

Okay, okay. Enough of that. Time to get to the matches.

Match 0: The Fraternity (Channing Decker + Trent Gibson) vs. Cheeseburger + Will Ferrara

The match started with The Fraternity, definitely getting face heat as local talent, doing their usual beer shenanigans. This resulted in Cheeseburger spitting beer in one of their faces to kick off the match. The match was solidly built on some back and forth exchanges, presenting The Fraternity boys as on equal ground with the visiting ROH talent. Cheeseburger’s underdog personality really gets the crowd going and he even hits a nice dive to the outside. The Fraternity heel it up, faking tags and isolating Cheeseburger as their target. They nail some solid offense, including their “Eiffel Tower” double elbow drop (that’s an immature sex joke, right there). Burger does solid underdog work, using The two members of the Fraternity against each other, but they almost get the win over him anyways. Ferrara comes in for the save and Cheeseburger gets the win with the Shotei.

Post match Ferrara gets on the stick and we find out that he and Cheeseburger will be chasing tag-team gold in ROH. That’s an underdog quest right there, I bet the belts are heavier then Cheeseburger.

Grade: C
Match 1: The Rebellion (Caprice Coleman + Rhett Titus) vs. Motor City Machine Guns (Alex Shelley + Chris Sabin)

The match started off very fast, It headed outside almost immediately, and coincidentally, entirely out of my view. From the echoing crashes I could tell they were doing a lot of ring barricade spots. When they did get back in the ring it was a pretty standard face vs heel tag team match, with the MCMG doing their most loved vintage spots. The rebellion came out on top out of nowhere, getting the victory in a moment I looked away due to general disinterest in the match. I just don’t like Rhett Titus or Caprice Coleman all that much.

Grade: C
Match 2: Hirooki Goto vs. Shane Taylor

The match starts out mostly with hard hitting strikes, presenting both men on mostly equal footing. Huge lariats and forearms traded back and forth. Taylor hits a huge splash and Goto kicks out of it, only to wind up eating a huge amount of Taylor’s plentiful posterior in the corner. Goto comes back with the GTR following a huge headbutt and fireman’s carry flipped into a neckbreaker over his knee.

Grade: B-
Match 3: CHAOS (Trent Beretta, Rocky Romero, and Gedo) vs. Dalton Castle and The Boys

The match starts with Rocky and Dalton in the ring, but he doesn’t want to lock up with the Party Peacock, so he tags in Trent, who likewise wants nothing of Castle and tags in Gedo. Castle does his Peacock pose and Gedo wants absolutely none of it, but RPG VICE jump off of the apron, unwilling to get back in with the bizarre and brazen Dalton Castle. So Gedo does the only reasonable thing, he imitates Castle and they have a pose off… until Gedo decks him.

Now the match kicks into gear, with the crowd in good spirits. There’s a fracas and Dalton clears the ring. CHAOS go to leave, fed up with the weirdness of Castle’s faction, but the boys chase them down and they rawl back to the ring, CHAOS in control, as Dalton waits. After brawling on the outside for a while, CHAOS isolate one of the boys and work him over. The other boy tries to jump in and Romero hits the Forever Clothesline. Then, with Dalton growing impatient on the outside, RPG VICE hit their trademark spots, making certain to work a good bit of comedy in amongst the athleticism.

Dalton distracts the ref and the Boys use twin magic to get a fresh man in so that Dalton can get the hot tag. He starts cleaning house, but eats double knees from RPG VICE. However, it is not enough to keep him down and Dalton is back in it, nails everyone with German Suplexes and hits the Bangarang on Gedo to win.

Grade: B
Match 4: Punishment Martinez vs. Hangman Page vs. Bully Ray

Crowd doesn’t think much of the entrants until Bully Ray is announced, then there is uproarious ovation. He gets on the mic, gets a good cheap ROH pop, says he wants to adhere to the code of honor… but no one else wants to shake hands. Page jumps him before the bell but Bully Ray dips into his bag of classic mannerisms and clears out the ring. It’s short lived success as Page and Martinez work together for a while to try and dominate the ring veteran. The alliance breaks down and Page gets really impressive as he catches Martinez out of the air with a big move. Completely unexpected and highlights why Hangman Page is somehow wrestling’s best kept secret. He’s so good but no one seems to care.

Page and Martinez do some good work outside the ring. Back in the ring afterwards Bully and Page work together for a moment, and Bully calls for “the tables” but page superkicks him and nearly secures himself the victory. Page gets another near fall on Martinez off of his ever improving flipping clothesline. Martinez kicks out and winds up chokeslamming everyone except the referee, but it’s Bully with the win off of a Bubba Bomb to Page.

Grade: B
Match 5: Will Ospreay vs Cody

Cody opens the match with a slap to Ospreay’s face, setting te tone of the match that would follow. They play a game of one-ups-manship, taking turns disrespecting each other and showing off in the early stages of this match. Ospreay even gets the chance to tie Cody up in a nice full body submission hold, reminding us that he can do more than flip around and shoot himself into works.

As the match develops Cody gains control, and The American Nightmare grinds away at Ospreay. He repeatedly thwarts Ospreay’s attempts to make a comeback. If Cody weren’t so beloved, this would have gotten him some good heel heat. Ospreay of course gets the babyface comeback, dumping Cody hard with a move I don’t think I’ve ever seen before. He follows it closely with a beautiful Spiral Tap-like dive but doesn’t secure the three count.

The match builds to a close with a huge sequence that teases the Cross Rhodes, but Cody can’t hit his big finish and Ospreay looks to take control by using his speed and agility. In short, Will flips a bunch. Cody gets the win off of an out-of-nowhere pursuit Disaster Kick that catches Ospreay out of mid air  as he springboards off the turnbuckle, followed by a Cross Rhodes for good measure. This match genuinely surprised me with its finishing sequence.

Grade: B+
Match 6: The Kingdom (Matt Taven + Vinny Marseglia) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (Tetsuya Naito + BUSHI)

Taven on the stick is better than he is in the ring. Before LIJ even have the opportunity to come down to the ring, Taven gets on the mic and cuts a good heel promo, getting cheap heat by ripping on local sports teams, insulting the fragile egos of hundreds in attendance. The crowd reacts vigorously and he lets them. He stands silent after cutting a remark and the crowd builds to a ravenous chant of “Shut the Fuck Up!”. Taven lifts the mic back to his mouth and delivers the death blow, “I’m not even talking!”.

Once LIJ are in the ring, The Kingdom jump the opposition to get the match started. They 2-on-1 Naito, who treats them like bitches and dumps them to the outside where BUSHI dives on them with alarming velocity. BUSHI absolutely wrecks them.

The Kingdom stay in control for a long while afterwards, working over BUSHI, but he makes a comeback and tags in Naito. Naito’s in like a ball of fire but the comeback is stuffed when his corner outside-in dropkick spot is stuffed. The match builds the audience’s frustration as The Kingdom keep stuffing LIJ’s comeback attempts. That is until BUSHI mists Vinnie out of midair Naito gets in a dick kick and Destino for the win. Sadly a key standout moment in this match was Matt Taven badly and obviously botching a powerbomb.

Grade: B
Match 7: Silas Young + The Beer City Bruiser vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL + SANADA) vs. The Briscoe Brothers (Mark + Jay Briscoe)

Mark and EVIL start off in the ring, but before they can even lock-up Silas blind tags EVIL. This sets a bit of a trend for the match where Silas and the Bruiser are the biggest antagonists in the match. Silas and mark engage in some cool chain wrestling and Silas executes a beautiful bridge escape at the end of the sequence. He’s seriously better than people give him credit for. Each man tags in his partner and Jay Briscoe and the Beer City Bruiser start getting into it when EVIL blind tags the Bruiser. Things again start to get going between EVIL and Jay when the Bruiser blind tags EVIL. I’m seeing a pattern here. With LIJ relegated to the apron, the Beer City Bruiser drops huge moves on jay Briscoe. He and Silas Young maintain control, even after Mark tags in, demolishing him.

Jay gets in and he clears the ring out, there’s a fracas and at the end its SANADA against Jay. SANADA ties him up into a ball and drop kicks him hard, looking to take control, but the Briscoes turn the situation around. They clear everyone out of the ring again and Mark hits a solid brainbuster on EVIL for a close 2 count. Multi-man shenanigans ensue and Beer City comes down on Mark with a gigantic Frog Splash, but SANADA breaks up the pin attempt. Then the match suddenly kicks into high gear, everyone is in and hitting everyone else with signature spots and big moves, the crowd goes wild. It all happened so fast I couldn’t note all the individual moments. Everyone spills outside in hectic, exciting madness and then the Beer City Bruiser just crushes everyone with a huge flip cannonball off of the apron. The Briscoes pick up the win with a neckbreaker/Froggybow combo.

Grade: B+
Match 8: KUSHIDA vs. Jay Lethal

Lightning-speed chain wrestling between the two men starts the match. Both men look great and are depicted evenly, each moving as fast as they can and mirroring each other to try and take the advantage and show up their opposition. They play a game of chicken with suicide dives, with jay eventually wrecking KUSHIDA who is out until the count of 19. Lethal gains, and maintains, control of the match with a series of nasty backbreakers. Both men look good during this part of the match, showing creative offense, but Lethal maintains firm control by going back to the backbreakers, clubbing blows to the back, and submissions. Lethal works over KUSHIDA like he were a technically gifted brawler heel to KUSHIDA’s babyface.

Lethal maintains control until KUSHIDA reverses a top-rope move into a combination submission and slam from the top. Jay goes for the Lethal Injection to try and put an end to KUSHIDA’s comeback but gets caught out of the air in a cross armbreaker. KUSHIDA switches arms but eventually Jay reverses the hold and transitions into a Figure-4 Leglock of his own. Lethal catches KUSHIDA with a big powerbomb and goes for his Hail to the King, only to be caught out of mid-air again in another cross arm breaker. Lethal escapes and winds up hitting a surprise cutter. It seems like Jay Lethal is in contol again, when KUSHIDA hits him with the Lethal Injection and transitions into the Hover Board Lock, but Lethal escapes.

KUSHIDA gets a huge Pele Kick and DDT to set up the finish, where he gets the win on Jay Lethal with a Small Package Driver. I have never before seen KUSHIDA use this move, myself, and it is one of my favourite moves in recent years. Looks vicious and also goes immediately into a pinning predicament. I adored this match but the crowd, for some reason, seemed oddly dead and rather disrespectful throughout.

Grade: A
Match 9: Hiroshi Tanahashi + The Addiction (Christopher Daniels + Kazarian) vs. The Elite (Kenny Omega, Matt Jackson, Nick Jackson)

The match starts off with Matt Jackson and the ROH World Champion Christopher Daniels in the ring. Matt disrespects the champ by Too Sweet-ing him in the eye, but the tables are quickly turned on him and he gets Too Sweet-ed himself, right in the eye, from each member of the face team. Matt scrambles out and Nick Jackson is in against Kazarian. Nick goes into his usual shenanigans, crotch chopping and telling Kazarian to suck it. They both put on a good display of agility. Then Tanahashi tags in and demands Kenny tag in too. Kenny gets in the ring, but instead of a sporting contest with Tanahashi, The Elite all rush over and jump their opposition en masse.

The Elite take advantage of the opportunity to do a 3-on-1 beat down but it plays for comedy a tonne, instead of serious violence. They tease the Terminator dive with all three members of The Elite, but they are interrupted. Then everyone takes a turn at trying to attack everyone else but they all miss in a prolonged comedy spot. The Elite retake control after the gag, and this time they hit the full three-man Terminator dive. The match at this point has been hectic, fun, and irreverent. Crowd chanting gets The Elite to do their 1 Boot-2 Boots-4 Boots spot that we’ve recently seen them do in cam footage from their UK tour. Kazarian is in against Kenny but again The Elite use shenanigans aand absolutely wreck him with repeated superkicks as they keep propping him back up on the apron after each kick, then they finish their gag spot with a nice senton. Somehow, unbelievably, Kazarian kicks out and still has all his teeth.

Tanahashi is in again and grabs Matt Jackson, putting him into an abdominal stretch and strumming him like he’s a guitar. Somehow Tanahashi can’t put Matt away so they plop him down in the face team corner and use rapid tags in cycle to just stomp away at him. Not just one rotation of tags either, multiple full rotations of the entire team. The Addiction do a good string of team combo moves, followed by The Elite doing the same. Nick Jackson winds up in the ring alone, facing both Daniels and Kazarian. He cures The Addiction all by himself, string together a series of moves that handles both men with ease, and works in his signature spots as well. Tanahashi hits the ring and gets both of the Young Bucks with a double Dragon Screw but can’t capitalize because Kenny is back in the fray.

Kenny kills Tanahashi with a powerbomb. Then the ring is chaos and everyone gets big moves in succession and the crowd loves it. Kenny takes on Daniels and there’s some good back and forth between the two until Kenny murders everyone with Dragon Suplexes. Daniels is almost beaten by a triple Superkick from the entire Elite but kicks out. The faces regroup when Tanahashi comes in like a bolt of lightning and hits Omega with Slingblade, which Daniels follows with a nice Uranage, then Tanahashi hits the High Fly Flow and Daniels follows him with the Best Moonsault Ever… but Kenny kicks out! It erupts into craziness with dives to the outside and an Indytaker outside the ring as well. Tanahashi is wrecked by this. Matt Jackson and Kazarian go outside together in a nasty spill with a gross bump. The referee gets kicked and Cody storms the ring for some old fashioned interference, giving Kenny the opportunity to hit the One-Winged Angel on Christopher Daniels for the win.

Grade: A-

Overall, a really enjoyable show. Even with their huge roster shakeup and the online uncertainty and criticism of the brand, Ring of Honor continue to produce exciting evenings of professional wrestling. So long as they continue to run shows in Toronto, particularly ones where they take strong advantage of their international partnerships, I will continue to happily attend. I’d love to see them do a similar type of tour, but taking advantage of their partnership with CMLL.

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#DiscoveringWrestling #018 – A Muy Bien Addendum

So, last week I posted a quickly put together introduction to Hajime Ohara, as part of my efforts to promote the great wrestling that people aren’t aware of or aren’t paying attention to. I was lucky enough to receive some good feedback from different corners of the internet I shared it with. So, this week, we’re going to address some of the things that were brought to my attention.

First, it was brought to my attention that I mention “Muy Bien” a bunch but I never make it clear why I use the term. It’s simple, really. It is Hajime Ohara’s catchphrase. It’s on his trunks and his merch and he says it in promos.

But, why does a Japanese wrestler spout seemingly random Spanish? Well, this ties directly into another frequently brought up point! I didn’t go enough into Ohara’s history. In the interest of, as my intial article proclaimed, this being part of a brief introduction I’m not going to go into tremendous detail here. Just the big stuff.  He started his career under the tutelage of two legends of Lucha Libre, Ultimo Dragon and Skayde, and spent the first portion of his career in Mexico. Throughout the 2000s he worked for a plethora of promotions, across the globe: CMLL, Dradition, Toryumon Mexico, Nu Wrestling Evolution, HUSTLE, and Zero-1. During this time he held few titles but did have an impressive 291 day reign with the NWA International Jr Heavyweight title. He worked in a few of Tajiri’s short-lived promotions in the early 2010s before finding his home with Pro Wrestling NOAH in 2013. He held tag gold in the junior division twice with Kenoh, but his January 7th 2017 Korakuen Hall victory has provided him with his first singles reign in the company.

It was suggested that I should illustrate some of his backbreaker variants, which is quite difficult to do without having GIFs. In the future I will try to make GIFs. For now, I will try to describe my favourite variation, which is when he stars with his opponent iin a Fireman’s Carry position and then flips them over his head onto his knee in a sickening looking backbreaker. He does it with such speed and snappiness that the change of position makes it genuinely look more wild and dangerous than a regular backbreaker, even though the bump is essentially the same.

Okay, then, to top it off, here’s some more videos:

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#DiscoveringWrestling #017 – Muy Bien! A brief introduction to Hajime Ohara

Until January 7th 2017 I was uninitiated into the ways of Muy Bien. I’ll admit to having a bias towards wanting to enjoy the show I was at. I sat on the hardcam bleachers in the legendary Korakuen Hall on my dream vacation, days removed from seeing Wrestle Kingdom 11, at a NOAH show. Thanks to the Fight Network and Mauro Ranallo, Pro Wrestling NOAH had been a powerful part of my indoctrination into the wonders of Puroresu. It was magical. Then Hajime Ohara fought Taiji Ishimori for the vacant GHC Jr Heavyweight championship.

I thought it at this event, and started reading it online afterwards, that Hajime Ohara is the New Messiah of the Backbreaker. This match was hard hitting, fast, crisp, and innovative. Ohara did things I have never seen before. He was quite exciting. Since then all of his title defenses have been solid entertainment and I find myself often imagining dream matches since the ever deepening number of inter-promotional relationships have come to light. With Impact Wrestling, AAA, and The Crash all partnered directly, or indirectly, with NOAH as of late, there is good opportunity for Ohara to have a wealth of diverse, interesting matches.

I’ll admit to having drifted away from NOAH for a long while after the death of Misawa, as many did. I regret it, but it had lost its heart for a while. During the whole muckaboo with Suzuki-Gun and NOAH’s very one-sided partnership with New Japan, Hajime Ohara performed admirably. I’m sad that I missed so much of his development in years past, but the wrestler he is now is a phenomenal, smooth performer. He is remarkably explosive, and this applies not just to the force he uses in his offense, but also his ability to suddenly burst forth with speed seemingly out of nowhere. This impressive, innovative, explosive performer is the culmination of Ohara’s thirteen year journey as a Pro-Wrestler, and I’m certain his rather impressive 11-3-0 MMA record has helped in how smooth and fluid his grappling is. Every single one of his wins came from submission.

With NOAH posturing for a rebirth, and putting on incredible title matches and solid shows on pretty much every card, Hajime Ohara sits at the cusp of a possible explosive year. He has all the tools he needs, and the landscape is primed for him to use them. These are the reasons I believe that he is someone whom, in 2017, you should discover for yourself. Get your eyes on him!

If you like this idea, of me writing not just about promotions and events but also spotlighting performers, please let me know. I would also appreciate any feedback you have about what I could say or do to help better present and provide valuable information to you.

Do you have any feedback or questions? Please leave a comment here.

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#NoLookingBack #013 – Wrestling Rumble in the #SketchbookAdventures Daddy-O!

Okay, okay, I’m cheating here a bit. These are also from an old sketchbook, the same one my mecha drawings are from. It’s all years old content, but I needed to have an article ready for today and figured that I haven’t shown off much in the way of my fictional Pro-Wrestling universe. So, here’s a smattering of some interesting stuff I did. Most of them sort of have an overarching visual theme, so we’re gonna start with the odd one out.

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That beard though…

Around this time I was trying to figure out how to convey more personality in my art for the first successful time. Power Lord here could easily have looked better if drawn with more style, but the idea behind this pose was the big guy gesturing with one finger pose. It should have been more in front of him and more pointed towards the “camera” to really get the job done. I really love how wacky his makeup looks.

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He’s  stylin’ motherfucker.

Believe it or not, this was a tremendous leap forward for me. Just trying to draw the head tilted and a body that was taking a distinctly non rigid position, trying to give him that suave and cool attitude of a P.I., seemed impossible at one time. Looking back at this I of course recognize that I failed in many ways to build proper anatomy and true foreshortening, but this was a step in the right direction. A step that would take many years to mature. I should probably draw more often.

Jorge here, unlike the Power Lord above, and most of the characters you’ll see below, is a big player in the mythology I am building.

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She’s dynamite with a laser beam.

GoldenGrrrl is me having fun with adapting Pro-Wrestling characters and archetypes from the real world through a different lens in my reality. She’s inspired by Golddust and is supposed to ooze with sexual danger and make people feel uncomfortable. I crafted her at the beginning of my desire to increase the number of female wrestlers in my story, and it has only grown to a level where I want to include even more, so I am certain that with the growing importance of that storyline I can find room for her to have a major role at some point. I chose her pose to try and make her seem weird and like Voldo from Soul Calibur.

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Somebody listens to too much King Diamond.

Cemetery is a major player in at least one storyline that dominates the cards of Jersey-State Pro Wrestling’s shows. While the time the major cast spend in JSPW is limited, the turmoil this Undertaker-meets-Raven-meets-Vampiro character and his Perverse Church faction create sends ripples through the fiction. I drew this around the time the E came up with their new belt design, and I liked it enough to model the JSPW belt after it. Heavy shading could have made this image seem more in character.

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Doing his best Bas Rotten impersonation.

The Yin-Yang Kid here is sorta my world’s version of the 1-2-3 Kid if he were a bit more modern. Not much to say here with him except that the soles of boots look very bad if the boot doesn’t really resemble a foot shaped object. Also he looks like he broke his ankles somehow, that is not a natural bend.

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Damn, I love this mask design.

ZomBiosis here is, by far, my favourite drawing in the group and one of the cooler designs I’ve done for this world over the years. one of the 2nd Generation cast of characters, that will come into play as the story progresses a la JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure. His pose is probably the closest I came to understanding foreshortening for a long while. Like a brief glimpse of something I could get better at but still couldn’t grasp. that might be part of why I have such a fondness for the character. That and I wanna wear his mask,

Okay, so, there’s a glimpse into a large and complex cast of characters that I can never fully get away from and that keeps getting larger and more intricate as I plan it out. After all, I want it to be the best Pro-Wrestling comic ever. These characters should all, even if for just one panel or crowd scene, show up again. And I have some interesting plans for the TEW booking simulators.

Do you have any feedback or questions? Please leave a comment here.

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#DiscoveringWrestling #015 – 5 Reasons you should give IMPACT WRESTLING some bloody respect.

With their troubled history it is easy to lump blame and negativity miles high, like giant pillars of owl dung, upon IMPACT WRESTLING, but to openly wish for their failure and to take up the rallying cry of “Fuck TNA!” shows a fundamental lack of respect for the company’s high points, and what their legacy is. I’m not certain that I can convince everybody to give them some respect, but I hope to make some strong attempts to do so. So, in no particular order, here are 5 good reasons that you should give TNA some respect.

Honourable Mentions: It’s another place for the boys to get work and it disappearing would mean a lot of talented people looking for new work for one. Then there is the often brought up X-Division and how phenomenal it really was at its peak (and I’d argue the talent has always been stellar).

1) AJ Styles. For eleven years of his absolutely brilliant career, AJ Styles called Total Nonstop Action home. In TNA he held the vaunted NWA World Heavyweight Championship and Tag Team championship, the TNA X-Division championship, the TNA Tag-Team championship, the TNA World Heavyweight championship, and pretty much every other accolade the company could concoct. You’d be surprised to note that they never tried having him cross-dress for the KnockOuts titles. He moved all over the card, competing in all sorts of matches. Through TNA’s foreign partnerships, he wrestled in AAA, CMLL, NJPW, and Wrestle-1. The point is, he did everything the company had to offer.

Certainly not all of it was the best. Some of it was total shit. But some of it was brilliant, and all of it was AJ Styles putting his heart, soul, and body, into becoming the best performer he could be in any given booking circumstances. You can’t spend eleven years working in one place, and doing everything that can be done there, and not have you come out the other end undeniably affected by it. AJ Styles has certainly proved that he is self-motivated and insanely talented since he left TNA, but for those who were watching him develop in that company, there was never any doubt that he truly was The Phenomenal One. Without TNA giving AJ Styles all of that time, on air and in front of a television audience, for him to hone his craft, it is doubtful that he would be in the same position he is in now.

2) It was the first major point of exposure for a lot talent. The rosters of WWE NXT, RAW, and SmackDown! are now replete with talent that got their first major break with TNA. Samoa Joe,  Austin Aries,  and Bobby Roode all put on career defining matches and spent many years with a company that, at one point, was considered the upstart that might challenge the E one day. Sadly TNA had an addiction to insane booking and faded stars. Nevertheless,  countless other incredible talent all called the company home. To this day they continue to do so, more recently giving Grado a huge potential audience out of pretty much nowhere.

Even if we expect that IMPACT WRESTLING can never rise to that speculative challenger height again, as a company with high production values and fifteen years of establishing itself a fanbase, however degraded it may be from its heights, they can, and will, have an important role to play in many future stars careers. They’ve done it before and can, certainly, do it again. Just look at the names these two entries contain for evidence.

3) It was a place where people could reinvent themselves. I fondly remember seeing Christian Cage debut in TNA. I had grown frustrated with the WWE in how they were treating him, and his start in TNA was great. He was given an opportunity and proved himself to be what he had never been allowed to be before: the guy. Over the course of its ups and down, IMPACT WRESTLING even provided perennial tag team wrestler Bubba Ray Dudley/Brother Ray the opportunity to invent the Bully Ray character, one that gave him a solid storyline built around himself and a place in the spotlight as a world champion. Even unto today, with their post-separation actions inciting jeers and hatred from the wrestling community, this oft maligned company provided Matt and Jeff hardy the creative freedom and platform to create the #BROKEN gimmick that has launched them into a brilliant career renaissance. I am confident that if they had never left the WWE, there would never have been chants of DELETE! echoing across wrestling venues throughout North America, indie and WWE, at this time.

4) International Exposure. International cross-promotional events and talent exchanges dot the landscape of TNA’s rocky history. I first watched Hiroshi Tanahashi wrestle on a TNA pay-per-view, in 2006, against AJ Styles, a full eight years before the two would meet again in New Japan. The first NJPW full show I watched was Wrestle Kingdom III, which featured heavy involvement from TNA who were advertising it as Global Impact. I tried to find it online for a price I could afford at the time and came across the complete unedited version on a DVD sellers site and bought that. It was a bootleg burned DVD, but it was a launching point for me headfirst into Puroresu, right alongside the Fight Network’s English-announcing dub of Pro-Wrestling NOAH. It’s funny how things come full circle with Anthem now owning all of my original gateway drugs for Japanese Pro-Wrestling.

Their annual World X Cup tournament exposed me to wrestlers from AAA, CMLL, AJPW, and Dragon Gate. Their announce team was never shy to tell you who they were, where they came from, and what they had done in their careers outside of TNA. This stood in direct opposition, and for the most part still stands that way today, to how the WWE handle international talent. I loved Abismo Negro. I bought a CMLL show with a Team TNA vs Team CMLL match from that same DVD seller. I discovered Mistico and Averno. My tastes diversified and I fell in love with how Pro-Wrestling transforms across cultural contexts. I can genuinely say that if TNA had never existed, I likely never would have become the fan I am today. The fan who had the trip of a lifetime in Tokyo fueld by my desire to attend Wrestle Kingdom, the fan who has made friends with performers and other fans alike, the fan who wants to contribute something back to the art I love. Maybe I’m an extreme example, but I cannot be the only one whose spark was kindled in this way by TNA.

They had the prescience to blaze a trail into India. In securing themselves TV deals in the highly populated foreign market, scouting talent from the country to bring onboard to make the product attractive to said population, and having a hand in setting up the short lived Indian Ring-Ka-King promotion, they assured that they are an indellible part of the face of Pro-Wrestling to this massive market, right next to Dalip Singh and the WWE.

Now, in 2017, under new management, they have a talent exchange with NOAH. Based on the March twelfth GREAT VOYAGE in YOKOHAMA showing, it looks promising, at the least for the quality matches it has generated in Japan and giving more international exposure to potential breakout stars like Moose. Considering the absolute tear that Pro-Wrestling NOAH has been on under the NOAH the REBORN moniker, it certainly couldn’t hurt either company to put their best people together to generate interest in both brands and to forge a new reputation for IMPACT WRESTLING, one that highlights impactfuland internationally influenced wrestling and sheds the bad habits of its heritage. But, we’ll have to wait and see on that one.

5) Women’s wrestling. Before NXT and the Women’s Revolution was even a twinkle in Paul Levesque’s eye, TNA was putting on some serious women’s wrestling matches. The company dedicated far more air time to women’s wrestling than contemporaneous WWE did and it let its female talent go at it just as hard as the men. Gail Kim excelled in TNA. Her tenure in the WWE before heading to TNA had made me curious about her, but in TNA’s Knockouts division she truly shone her brightest and excelled far beyond what she had ever accomplished in the E.

Indeed, there was a general attitude in the way TNA treated its women that was a step up from the WWE at the time. In an era where the WWE would phase the Women’s Championship into the Diva’s belt, emblazoned with a delicate butterfly, TNA had both the KnockOuts Tag and singles titles and women routinely, to this day, compete in hardcore matches. They were ahead of the curve, by a long shot. It wasn’t always perfect, but it generally outclassed what the WWE was offering contemporaneously. Like everything with TNA, it went through its ups and downs, but it fueled and helped shape in me a desire to see more intense women’s wrestling. It was around that same time that I would first start to look into Joshi wrestling.

I also find it useful to remember that TNA didn’t come up with an angle making fun of the beautiful Mickie James for being overweight and calling her Piggie James on national television. So there’s also that. Yeah…

Look, I get it. TNA dropped the ball. They dropped it so hard that they lost it in the crust of the Earth. But somehow, amongst all that mess, they still managed to do some incredible good. The story of TNA and IMPACT WRESTLING is one of peaks and valleys. But no one ever seems to remember or care about the peaks, preferring to mock and throw verbal rocks at the company. They have done a lot for the industry, for the talent, and for me. Yeah, I stopped watching them when they got really bad, and every now and then I would check in to see how they were doing. It really wasn’t all bad, and learning to acknowledge and respect it for what it did right, well, it could go a long way towards helping them recover. Anthem is gonna need all the help it can get to rehabilitate this damaged brand, and they have a lot of cool talent and great archive footage to forge a new path with. Give them some credit. Tell them what you want to see more of, and leave the hate out of it.

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